A Return to Parkton | Marty's World

A Return to Parkton

November 19, 2013
By

One of the good things about being trapped in the Papua New Guinea jungles for weeks at a time is that I get to do a lot of writing. And on this trip, I’ve finished polishing my second Parkton novel.

Finding Safe Ground is set in the same wonky town as 809 Jacob Street, but otherwise, the books aren’t related.

Finding Safe Ground delves into the history of Parkton, and gives some insight as to why Charles F. Longworth, the founding father, planted the hazelnut trees in a rough circle around town. It also introduces you to a bunch of characters who will feature prominently in this series of books. The main star is Jamie Holston, a man forever battling to control the raging darkness inside of him. That darkness was the reason he was booted from the army, and why he was almost killed during his dark, drug-fueled days at university. It’s a side of him he tries to keep under control, but the events in Finding Safe Ground won’t let that happen.

And at the center of it all is the Symmes Institute, one of the leading scientific organisations in the world. But they’re far more than they appear to be, as is their CEO, Dr. Glen Reirden…

The synopsis is being mangled by my LA editor pal (we’re up to version 4, but I think we’re about ready to sign off on it), and then it’s time to send this thing out into the big spooky world. Wish it luck.

The second book in this series is currently sitting at 49,346 words, so I’m aiming to get the first draft of that finished by Christmas time. And then, while that one is being managed by my blood-thirsty editor, I will begin part three. Each will be a stand-alone book, but they will also combine into something more.

Time will tell if these books ever see the light of publication; they might all end up as fancy dreams in this lunatic’s head, or maybe campfire tales out here in the jungle.

Tags: , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Barstool Eyes

"...the only fuel you have to make the fire blaze on the page / screen is the stuff of your own being. An artist consumes his or herself in the act of making art."
[Clive Barker, 2009]